Monthly Archives: May 2015

May 28th, 2015

Build Rapport with Six Critical Skills

building-rapport

Build Rapport with Six Critical Skills

Some people are extroverts; others are introverts. Some people have expressive communications styles; others get their points across quietly but with authority. There is no right way to be. The only right thing is to appreciate the other person and make an effort to build rapport.

In my last two blog posts,  I discussed the importance of building rapport in the articles, Five Tips for Building Rapport and Building Rapport with WIIFO, not WIIFM. To be honest, building rapport is one of those concepts that often can’t be explained, but you know it when you see it. You hit it off with someone or get along well. Rapport is about building understanding and harmony with another person in a way that supports easier and more effective communication.

At Richardson, we often talk of the Six Critical Skills for consultative selling. They also are useful skills for rapport building, which is essential in differentiating yourself in a sales situations and establishing a personal connection.

Presence: Ability to project confidence, conviction, and interest in body language and voice Relating: Ability to use acknowledgment, rapport, and empathy to connect Questioning: Ability to explore needs and create dialogue Listening: Ability to understand content and emotional message Positioning: Ability to leverage client needs to be persuasive Checking: Ability to elicit feedback

The first two skills — Presence and Relating — come into play immediately upon » Continue Reading.

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May 26th, 2015

Building Rapport with WIIFO, not WIIFM

Building Rapport

Building Rapport with WIIFO, not WIIFM

Salespeople can spend a lot of time on the road, traveling to meetings or client presentations. Thoughts naturally wander to internal dialogue: “How am I going to meet my goals?” or, “What’s in it for me?” — known as the shorthand, WIIFM.

When you get stuck in WIIFM, you’re not as “other” oriented as you should be. Building rapport is much easier and successful when you focus on what’s in it for others (WIIFO).

In conversation, focusing too much on your own thoughts and what you’ll say next stands in the way of personal connection and rapport. It is better to come to the discussion well versed on the area that you’re addressing and then to have that conversation with a nonjudgmental, open mind.

Consider the Buddhist parable of the empty cup. You can come into a conversation so full of information that nothing more gets in, just as pouring tea into an already full cup causes it to spill over. But, if you are ready to listen, becoming an “empty cup,” you can receive more than you came with.

Building rapport happens when there’s real openness about what is actually going on in the moment between you and the other person. You’re not talking to an organization, but an individual — a person, a human being — who is largely an emotional being. So, if you’re not connecting at an » Continue Reading.

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May 21st, 2015

Five Tips on How to Build Rapport

Rapport Building

Five Tips for How to Build Rapport  

I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.

― Maya Angelou

When dealing with people — customers, prospects, colleagues, friends, family — it’s important to think about them not as creatures of logic, but as creatures of emotion. We are all human beings, and we engage our whole selves in conversations and relationships. Some people call this IQ and EQ, left brain/right brain, and even new brain/old brain.

The point is:  People are complex beings who often draw on emotions more than logic, knowledge, or intellect when making connections with others. There’s a dynamic — changing energy or chemistry that passes between people. This is the basis of building rapport.

How can you be sure building rapport is positive ? Here are five tips on how to build rapport:

Be Positive: When engaging with another person, your attitude affects the kind of rapport that you build. Are you smiling? Is your body posture open? Do you exude confidence and enthusiasm? It’s not about being someone you’re not or looking like an excited cheerleader. It’s about showing genuine interest and being authentic in who you are. Be Present: Be mindful of the person you’re trying to build rapport with. Listen carefully to what he/she is saying. Try to understand his/her world and » Continue Reading.

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May 19th, 2015

Prospecting and networking apps for ATD Conference attendees

atd-conference

Prospecting and networking apps for ATD Trade show and Conference attendees

If you were to time travel back a decade or two, you could revisit attending conferences with reams of promotional paper goods and boxes of business cards in tow. In the pre-tech era the traditional conference protocol was to bring plenty of hard copy materials, and never be caught short. It was better to come prepared with too many business cards than too few. Think about not being able to share your contact information with a person you just met at a conference that you’d love to collaborate with. If you weren’t carrying plenty of business cards, that could be one crucial missed opportunity.

Fast forward to today and how times have changed. Partly due to a more ecologically-minded approach to business and daily life and partly due to convenience, now paper goods have been largely replaced by handheld devices with storage capacities and technological sophistication unimaginable just even a short decade ago.

Has conference clutter been minimized in the modern age? Absolutely! But with tech innovations comes a new challenge: Selectively choosing from the many app options at one’s disposal. The scope of available apps can be dizzying, and dedicated conference attendees should have a streamlined list of what is most beneficial for their respective needs.

With the 2015 ATD International Conference & Exposition in full gear, there is no better time than the present to » Continue Reading.

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May 15th, 2015

Do You Know What Ensures the Greatest Payoff from Sales Training Program Investments?

sales training program

Do You Know What Ensures the Greatest Payoff from Sales Training Investments? (The Answer Will Most Likely Surprise You.)

In a comprehensive survey of research and literature conducted more than 25 years ago, it was determined that there was a growing recognition of a “transfer problem” in corporate training and development. Specifically, in 1990, research analysts estimated that while companies around the world spent approximately $50 billion on training and development, no more than 10% of those expenditures actually result in transfer to the job.

Fast forward 25 years later, and the emerging trends of research on training transfer continue to reflect similar evidence that is just as sobering. Even though global spend to improve corporate performance has doubled over the past 25 years to more than $100 billion, analysts now estimate that, on average , less than 50% of program content is transferred to the work environment immediately after training, less than about 20% is being used at the end of 30 days, and only 10% of expenditures for training ever result in observable behavior change on the job.

So what haven’t we learned… yet?

Given how important skilled salespeople must be for an organization to continually achieve desired business results, we need to understand how to resolve the 25+ year old transfer problem and ensure the greatest payoff from our organization’s sales training program investment.

Researchers determined that there were three key roles acting to make training » Continue Reading.

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