Viewing Posts for: Michael E. Pepe, PhD

August 2nd, 2016

Multigenerational Sales Coaching: Myths, Truths, and Key Considerations When Coaching Millennials

Multgenerational sales coaching - coaching millennials

Modern sales leaders and managers are often faced with the challenge of providing multigenerational sales coaching. Providing sales coaching to millennials might seem like a particularly challenging endeavor – this is because there are many myths about the preferences of the millennial workforce that are not true. Understanding how to connect with your millennial salespeople can help you learn how to coach top performers.

MYTH #1: Millennials do not want to be coached.

Not true. In fact, recent studies show that millennials want coaching at work nearly 50% more often than other employees. Also, they seek feedback more frequently than older generations in the workforce (SuccessFactors, 2015).

MYTH #2: Taking a quantitative approach with your coaching feedback dehumanizes the coaching relationship.

Using a numerical rating scale, either against a standard or against a millennial’s colleagues, helps contextualize feedback and provides an opportunity to monitor progress. It’s likely that higher performers will embrace an internal ranking against their colleagues, while a moderate or lower performer may be better served with a comparison against an external standard. The ranking or comparison is not for punishment, but for growth. It can help you establish a common language and calibrate change consistently. Be mindful of your choice.

Key considerations for Multigenerational Sales Coaching

Consider that connecting with millennial employees frequently resonates with their cadence for information and their digital world. Millennials are accustomed to instant access to » Continue Reading.

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January 5th, 2016

Stop, Look, and Listen! Adapting Learning for the New Workforce

adapting learning

If you are planning on delivering a traditional learning program in a corporate setting, stop. Look at the workplace environment and inhabitants. Listen to the sound of the new commerce.

Workspaces are more open and casual. Inhabitants are more diverse in every way. Mobile devices abound. Paper and writing tables are scarce. There is a sense of continuous motion. Start and stop times are difficult to identify. Organizational hierarchies are nearly invisible.

Now, the largest demographic in the U.S. labor force, workers of the Millennial generation, have often been criticized or, even blamed for some of the generational conflict in the workplace as they push up against the traditional power holders in organizations, the Baby Boomers. Another, sometimes painful, reality is that we are changing and learning from the new workers! The Millennial and other younger generations have grown up with technology in hand. Their hand-helds are their security blankets. They multitask as a way of life, are comfortable in a self-directed learning environment, and are adept in digital and electronic communications, whether e-mail, text, twitter, or video calls.

When it comes to training, Millennials know how to mine data and gather information; they don’t default to an instructor to present fundamental concepts to them. There are many components of traditional Learning and Development (L&D) programs that can be carved out and deliver more effectively on digital platforms. This is where technology shines, with eLearning, webinars, self-paced learning, virtual classrooms, » Continue Reading.

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August 11th, 2015

Adapting Learning for the New Workforce

adaptive-learning

Adapting Learning for the New Workforce

The reality of the generational shift in today’s workforce is undisputed. Much has been written about the sea change taking place, with baby boomers retiring in record numbers as millennials are entering the workforce and taking on their first supervisory roles. Consider these numbers:

10,000 daily Medicare enrollments 73,000,000 — the size of the Baby Boomer class 2015 — the year that millennials become the largest demographic in the US workforce

What does this mean for the Learning function? In a word: Opportunity.

Programmatic Learning as we once knew it is dead! Now is the ideal time to conduct a post-mortem on past practices from a content, process, and delivery standpoint. With today’s technology, we can more fully engage tomorrow’s leaders while improving efficacy.

Beyond the issues of learning content, instructional process, and delivery vehicles, the Learning function can make greater contributions to any organization by thinking beyond traditional functional boundaries. Learning opportunities and “teachable moments” reside within and across the entire employment experience and lifecycle, including the following:

Organizational structure: The trend toward flatter organizations scares people if they think about career growth from a traditional perspective… always up. Cross -functional assignment, rotations, and special, entrepreneurial projects present opportunities to engage and retain employees? Processes: Are there clear expectations about what to do and how things should be done? We’ve been lobbying for clear expectation setting for years … and not doing » Continue Reading.

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