Category Archives: Team Selling

June 6th, 2017

Winning the Team Sale: Chapter 5 – The Reorganizer

Reorganize your selling team

The sales meeting ends.  Now what?  Fist bumps in the parking lot, of course!  You and your team crushed it.  Or did you?

During the Regroup stage of the team selling process, you have an opportunity to play yet another role, what I call the Reorganizer.  This involves getting your team realigned after the sales meeting and setting the stage for more and even better work together in the future.

See if you recognize any of these common occurrences after a meeting or pitch:

Your team members scatter to the winds for other commitments. You talk it through in the car on the way to the airport or your next appointment. You assume your team members are clear on their roles in the follow-through plan. You have no opportunity to give or receive feedback about how the team performed. REORGANIZE FOR NEXT STEPS AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

Reconvening the team following a sales meeting or pitch accomplishes several things:  a) it facilitates follow-through on client expectations, reinforcing commitments made during the meeting; b) it creates a feedback loop that allows team members to share with one another how to improve individual and team performance in future sales outings; c) it avoids repetition of the same mistakes and gives the team the chance to replicate high points that were hit; and d) it sets the stage to re-recruit colleagues for future team sales opportunities.

Regroup meetings — a.k.a. » Continue Reading.

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June 1st, 2017

Winning the Team Sale: Chapter 4 – The Captain

Being the captain of your selling team

Oh captain, my captain.  This chapter’s title may trigger images of a captain’s hat, a pipe, turtleneck, and pea coat.  Okay, wrong kind of captain.  We’re talking now about how to captain a selling team in executing an effective sales meeting or pitch.

If you can snap out of the ship captain daydream, we’d like you to consider a different picture.  Imagine instead a point guard during a basketball game.  She is responsible for handling the ball, running the plays, passing the ball to the player who is in the best place to score, and rescuing the player who is trapped in a corner.

Leading a sales meeting may be less exciting to you than skippering a ship or playing hoops.  But being your selling team’s captain during a sales meeting or pitch is just as important.  Every team needs a leader, a point person to captain the effort.  Without one, the team loses its agility.  Customer meetings can take all sorts of unexpected twists and turns, including:

The meeting starts late, and you have less time than expected. The customer stakeholders who show up are different from those you planned for. The interests of the decision makers changed or conflict with those you were told about. The technology for your on-screen demo isn’t working. Members of your team freeze, become defensive, or talk themselves into a corner. LEADING AN EFFECTIVE SELLING TEAM

Where’s that ship captain when you need » Continue Reading.

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May 30th, 2017

Winning the Team Sale: Chapter 3 – The Director

Playing the Director in a Team Sale

Without practice, what are your team’s chances of success at a high-stakes sales meeting?

If the stakes are life and death, like they are for the Blue Angels flight demonstration squadron, the question is not whether, but how much you should practice.  Flying multiple 22-ton jets at speeds up to 500 mph, and with as little as 36 inches between them — side-by-side or upside-down — the stakes don’t get higher.  Pilots must have a minimum of 1,250 tactical jet-flight hours.  On top of their individual proficiencies, the squadron practices as a unit on roughly 120 training missions prior to its first Blue Angels performance.

A group sales meeting or pitch is neither a show nor a life-or-death moment.  Yet, the stakes for a group sales meeting are high enough that you’ve asked others to contribute to the effort.  Your “pilots” all bring individual proficiencies, but how much practice do you generally do as a unit prior to an important customer or prospect meeting?

PRACTICING FOR A TEAM SALE

Practice is about application with the intent to improve.  Successful selling squads practice together not because a manager tells them to; effective teams practice as a group because they realize:

Without it, they have a random chance of winning, and they’d rather stack the odds. Feedback is essential to strengthen individual contributions and the team’s performance. Repetition reduces anxiety for all » Continue Reading.

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May 25th, 2017

Winning the Team Sale: Chapter 2 – The Organizer

Organizing a selling team

Ever been to a mess of a sales meeting or pitch?  Perhaps you have seen the following happen:

Moments before the start, the salesperson is crawling around under the conference table searching for the dongle to hook up the projector. Everyone is present and accounted for, but the pitchbooks are MIA. The pitchbooks arrived, but one of your team members didn’t. Presentation materials include typos and mistakes.

Playing the Organizer role for a selling squad is, in my experience, one of the heavier lifts for most salespeople.  It takes project management skills, advance planning, attention to detail, and patience.  Did I mention these things are a challenge for many salespeople?

Organizing a selling team engenders confidence among your colleagues, and for customers, it creates the look of a focused and cohesive team at a sales meeting.  Being a strong Organizer will also enhance your ability as a Recruiter for future selling team efforts.  Not to mention avoiding 11pm runs to the UPS Store the night before a pitch, or embarrassing mistakes during a customer meeting.

5 WAYS TO ORGANIZE YOUR SELLING SQUAD

So, regardless of how organized you generally are, how can you play the Organizer role successfully for your team?  Here are five best practices to help:

Share information: Great Organizers facilitate information-sharing among team members so that they all have information that is current and that will help them perform their roles at the » Continue Reading.

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May 23rd, 2017

Winning the Team Sale: Chapter 1 – The Recruiter

Winning team sale - recruiting your team

Creating an effective selling squad is the first step on the road to winning a group sales meeting. Building the right team can help you advance an important sales opportunity or retain a key customer. Assembling good people onto the wrong team can be costly — to budgets, to your company’s chances to win other opportunities, and to your own reputation.

Putting together great selling teams requires you to play the role of Recruiter. And, as a recruiter for a team pitch or sales meeting, you are faced with three basic questions:

1. How Many? 2. Whom? 3. How Will You Ask?

HOW MANY?

For meeting attendees, the easy answer to the first question is: you should bring a comparable number to the customer stakeholders who will be attending your sales meeting. For example, to meet with three decision makers from a buying organization, you might aim for a selling squad of three. Taking too few people risks being unable to address significant areas of interest for the customer. Taking too many can cause your customer to question individual competency and cost structure.

There is a subtler answer to this important question: limit participants to those who will play a significant role in your sales meeting. What does significant mean? At a minimum, each member should be addressing capabilities or answering questions for 10 minutes or more during the meeting. By setting this threshold, be » Continue Reading.

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May 18th, 2017

Winning the Team Sale

Winning the team sell

Team selling today is no longer required just for blockbuster business-to-business sales pitches. Whether you are in consulting, investment banking, or technology or are a financial advisor, home remodeler, or lawyer, pivotal meetings with clients and prospects now often involve more people — on both sides of the table. In fact, according to Harvard Business Review, “…the number of people involved in B2B solutions purchases has climbed from an average of 5.4 two years ago to 6.8 today.”

Significant technology advances in recent years have enabled customers to gain information about their options faster, and without you. In addition, economic instability, geopolitical concerns, corporate scandals, and public relations blunders have created mistrust and heightened attention to risk and return on investment. Clients now arrive at meetings and calls ready to give all their stakeholders a voice and wanting to look behind the curtain to the people in your organization who will own the work after the sale.

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May 11th, 2017

Sell Like a Team — New Book by Richardson Senior Consultant Michael Dalis

Sell Like A Team Book

The ability of sellers to form teams that add value and present a compelling case to buyers is no longer optional but is required in today’s complex sales environment.

For many sellers, executing a successful team presentation might feel like the luck-of-the-draw, but this is simply not the case. Richardson Senior Consultant and Trainer Michael Dalis demystifies team selling in his new book Sell Like a Team: The Blueprint for Building Teams That Win Big at High-Stakes Meetings.

Team Selling Skills Unlock Revenue

Prior to the great recession and the proliferation of online information sources, team selling was often limited to blockbuster business-to-business sales pitches, but now every sales person in every industry must have the ability to form an effective team to win business. In fact, according to Harvard Business Review, “… the number of people involved in B2B solutions purchases has climbed from an average of 5.4 two years ago to 6.8 today.”

Sell Like a Team offers practical insights into the importance of developing the ability to form effective selling teams that are comprised of both sellers and non-sellers.

According to Dalis:

“… As sellers, we tend to focus on getting our salespeople ready. The sale is often made by more than one person … I’ve got to have a senior person, a subject matter expert, and a technology specialist come and join me. They haven’t had sales training, but they are » Continue Reading.

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November 29th, 2016

Team Selling Today

Who are those people on the other side of the conference table? Why are they there? Why do more of my key sales meetings seem like they involve a cast of many? And why does “my guy” seem more and more powerless? Team selling today is no longer just required for blockbuster B2B sales pitches. Whether you are a B2C home remodeler, financial advisor or surgeon; or a B2B consultant, money manager or technology provider, pivotal meetings with clients and prospects more often now involve more people – on both sides of the table.

The purpose of this post is to spotlight what’s driving this dynamic, and what you can do to adapt to this reality.

Defining Team Selling

I define team selling as when two or more people from an organization (and its affiliates or co-selling partners) join forces at a customer touchpoint, in-person or virtual, to advance an opportunity or retain an account.

Why Team Selling is Becoming More Common

You’re a good salesperson, so why the need to involve others?

Here are some examples of recent developments that have impacted how your customers make buying decisions:

Mobile communication and Wi-Fi Crowd-sourced reviews (i.e., Yelp) On-line discussion forums (i.e., LinkedIn interest groups) 2008-09 financial crisis

The first three technology advances enable customers to gain information about their options – faster and without you. The fourth event, The Great Recession, created mistrust and » Continue Reading.

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